27 January 2016

The Heinkel 111 - Deliverer of Spies

HE 111 (model)  (HE 111 (painting)  (From German Aircraft of WWII website)German Aircraft of WWII website)
HE 111 (painting)
(From German Aircraft of WWII website)
Between the summer of 1940 and the spring of 1941, the German Abwehr (Intelligence Service) attempted to insert a number of espionage agents into Great Britain.

Some were sent by boat, others were sent by aircraft. There has been a fair bit of discussion about which German aircraft was used to drop the parachute agents. General consensus seems to have settled on the Heinkel 111 (HE 111), a versatile medium bomber designed by the Germans in 1934.

Given the constrictions of the Versailles Treaty conditions, the Heinkel 111 was originally presented as a civilian aircraft and early models found service with Lufthansa. Soon enough, however, it's real potential as a bomber was exploited.

There are several Heinkel 111's still in existence, as well as a Spanish version (Casa 2.111) that is virtually identical to the HE 111. In addition, there are many model-building kits of the HE 111 that provide helpful information. Unfortunately, photos of the interior of a HE 111 are not all that common and it takes a bit of persistence to begin to stitch together the most likely procedure for dropping parachute spies.

The Heinkel 111 was a twin-engined aircraft with two machine gun positions, one on the belly of the fuselage and one on the top. The cockpit was almost entirely enclosed by glass providing the pilot with an excellent field of view. The bomb load on the 1940/41 versions of the HE 111 was not carried on the exterior of the aircraft, but rather inside the fuselage, just behind the cockpit.

Three-dimensional computer model of the interior of an HE 111  (from Cobra 6 - Deviant Art)
Three-dimensional computer model of the interior of an HE 111
(from Cobra 6 - Deviant Art)

Based on the testimony of some of the captured parachute spies, it would appear that the HE 111 aircrafts used for the espionage missions had been modified. Their bomb compartments had been removed and the parachutists were dropped through the former bomb bay doors.
Three-dimensional computer model of the interior of an HE 111  (from Cobra 6 - Deviant Art)
Three-dimensional computer model of the interior of an HE 111
(from Cobra 6 - Deviant Art)

Another possibility that has been suggested in some WWII forums is that the agents exited the aircraft via the belly hatch entrance (which was also the lower machine gun position).
Lower Gunner position in belly hatch of HE 111. The entrance would lie beneath the padding. (From Scale Plastic & Rail website)
Lower Gunner position in belly hatch of HE 111.
The entrance would lie beneath the padding.
(From Scale Plastic & Rail website)
A video from the Military Channel helpfully shows a flight crew entering the aircraft via the belly hatch. Whether or not it was used as an exit for parachute agents is another matter.
Flight crew entering HE 111 (From Wings of Luftwaffe 1/3 video on YouTube - 1:49 minute mark)
Flight crew entering HE 111
(From Wings of Luftwaffe 1/3 video on YouTube - 1:49 minute mark)

A model of an HE 111 showing the open bomb bay doors (From Scale Modelling Now website)
A model of an HE 111 showing the open bomb bay doors
(From Scale Modelling Now website)
Several of the parachute agents noted that the exit was quite narrow and tight, suggesting that they did not drop via the belly hatch, which appears to be wide enough for the flight crew to enter easily.

The bomb bay doors, on the other hand were quite narrow. It doesn't take much to imagine that a spy dressed in multiple layers of clothes and a flight suit, with a parachute on his back and a transmitter set on his front, might get stuck trying to squeeze through the elongated, but narrow, bomb bay doors.

The underside of a HE 111 model showing the open bomb bay doors  and the underside of the bomb racks. While this model has an off-white underside, the plane used for spy drops would most assuredly have had a dark underside. (From The Scaler Review website)
The underside of a HE 111 model showing the open bomb bay doors
and the underside of the bomb racks. While this model has an off-white
underside, the plane used for spy drops would most assuredly have had a
dark underside.
(From The Scaler Review website)
At this point in time, we can really only make educated guesses as to how the spies were dropped over England. Suffice to say, it was most likely a terrifying and dangerous experience. Several of the spies injured themselves leaving the aircraft. One can see how the open bomb bay doors may have hindered a smooth exit.


Additional Information

Excellent series of videos on the history of the Heinkel 111, originally from the Military Channel.
Wings of Luftwaffe 1/3
Wings of Luftwaffe 2/3
Wings of Luftwaffe 3/3

The Scalar Review website has some nice photos of the HE 111 at the Gardermoen Museum in Norway.

The RAF Museum at Hendon (London) also has an HE 111 on display.

I am greatly indebted to all the avid modellers out there who have attempted such faithful representations of the original aircraft.

22 January 2016

False Alarm with Clara Bauerle

In December 2015, I made a significant breakthrough with Lt. Col. William Edward Hinchley Cooke, receiving his birth registration from the archives in Dresden. While searching on Ancestry for his mother's relations, I realized that a whole swath of new indexed German records had become available on Ancestry. Not only for Dresden, but also for Berlin.

After happily discovering numerous family records from the early 1920s, I turned my attention to peripheral research.

Could I find the death registration for Clara Bauerle? My initial excitement turned to disappointment when I realized that the newly released records for Berlin only covered the period from 1874 to 1920. My research has suggested that Clara passed away in Berlin in December 1941, a full 21 years after the most recent window into the past.

On the other hand, I did notice that several German cities (Hamburg, Mannheim, Mainz, Dresden) had death records that extended far as 1950 and 1952. So, once again, there is hope for more recent records and a break in the case.

18 January 2016

Ramsey Rural Museum

Display of fragment from Josef Jakob's parachute Ramsey Rural Museum
Display of fragment from Josef Jakob's parachute
Ramsey Rural Museum
Near the town of Ramsey, Huntingdonshire, is a historical treasure, the Ramsey Rural Museum. The Museum is managed and maintained by volunteers and is both quaint and informative. Housed in renovated 17th century farm buildings, the Museum exhibits include over 200 years of local history.

I visited the Museum briefly in 2010 and while I had a quick look around the war exhibits, I missed seeing a most interesting display which included a fragment of Josef Jakob's parachute. A contact at the Museum kindly sent me a picture of the display which I blogged about Josef's parachute gear a couple of years ago.

Display on Josef Jakobs at Ramsey Rural Museum
Display on Josef Jakobs at Ramsey Rural Museum
In August of last year, in conjunction with the Ramsey 1940s Weekend celebrations, I wrote a letter to the organizers of the weekend asking them for assistance in contacting the descendants of the locals who originally encountered Josef.

I didn't hear back from the Ramsey Weekend people but, last month, I learned through Martyn Smith, that  the Ramsey Rural Museum had posted a display on the story of Josef Jakobs and included my letter as part of the display.

The first part of the display tells the story of how Josef landed at Dovehouse Farm on the night of 31 January, 1941, with a broken ankle. After spending a night in agony, he fired his pistol into the air the following morning, attracting the attention of two local farmers. The farmers contacted the Ramsey Police, who contacted the Home Guard, and the rest is history.

Display on Josef Jakobs at Ramsey Rural Museum
Display on Josef Jakobs at Ramsey Rural Museum
The second part of the display, entitled, Help Needed, touched on my letter: The photograph is a bit faint but the text reads:

Josef Jakobs the Germany Spy captured in Ramsey in 1941.

Gigi Jakobs the grand-daughter of Josef Jakobs, the hapless German spy who landed at Dovehouse Farm, Ramsey Hollow on 31 January 1941, has been researching his life. She visited Ramsey a few years ago and met Stewart Jackson from Dovehouse Farm, had a peek at the Ramsey Rural Museum and took pictures outside the Ramsey Police Station.

Gigi has made contact with a few folk descended from some of the main characters in the Josef Jakobs' saga. Martyn Smith (grandson of Police Inspector Horace Jaikens) and Ramsey Hertzog (son of Dr. Willem Hertzog) and is now looking for more.

In particular, the farmers (Charles Baldock & Harry Coulson), Home Guard Volunteers (Harry Godfrey, William Henry Newton) or Police Officers (Ernest Pottle & Thomas Oliver Mills).

Is it you
Are you a relation of these gentlemn?
If so Gigi would like to hear from you.
Please leave your contact details at the HQ Building in the main Camp area and we will pass them on to her.

It would appear from the context of the questions, that the display was posted at the Ramsey 1940s Weekend but, alas, to date, it has generated no leads. Although, there is always tomorrow. Or the next day.

13 January 2016

A Well-Dressed Spy

Seamstress Apprenticeship Drawing
Seamstress Apprenticeship Drawing
If I had any artistic talent whatsoever, I would attempt to draw the fashion ensemble that Josef Jakobs was wearing when he parachuted out of the German aircraft on 31 January, 1941. Alas, my skills do not lie in that direction, despite the fact that my mother studied as a seamstress and seems to have a bit of talent in that direction (see drawing at right).


There are several excellent descriptions of the clothing that Josef wore but, given that we are separated from that time by 75 years, the words "lounge suit" really don't create a picture in my mind. Researching German fashion in 1940/41 is also a bit of a challenge. If, for example, I find a picture of an English overcoat from 1940, would that look the same as what Josef was wearing? Good question. To which, at the moment, I have no answers. But, I figured I'd start somewhere.

Light Grey Herring-bone Tweed Overcoat
I found a picture of a grey tweed overcoat, but one made in England and it doesn't quite look herring-bone. Still, I figure it gives one an idea of how Josef would have appeared from the outside. Given the fact that he parachuted into a rather soggy England, one wonders why he was not also equipped with a trenchcoat and/or an umbrella.

Grey tweed overcoat
Grey tweed overcoat

Grey-striped Lounge Suit
 This one is a bit trickier. Searching for "lounge suits" and "1940s" on Google produces a bewildering array of images. Some English, some American, some European. This first image is from a German fashion magazine from the 1940s so probably provides a fair approximation of Josef's suit.
1940s style German suits - from Gentleman's Gazette
1940s style German suits - from Gentleman's Gazette

Another image... looks grey and striped, and similar in style to the image above. 
Lounge Suit - circa 1940s
Lounge Suit - circa 1940s

There is one photograph of Josef in what appears to be his suit. It would appear to have been quite dark-grey.
Josef Jakobs - 1941 - National Archives - KV 2/27
Josef Jakobs - 1941 - National Archives - KV 2/27
Woolen Pullover
It also turns out that around the early 1940s, men were switching from wearing vests under their suits to wearing pullovers, something akin to this image from the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Suit with woolen pullover - Victoria & Albert Museum
Suit with woolen pullover - Victoria & Albert Museum

When I hear the word pullover, I think of a full-sleeved sweater but apparently these types of pullovers were sleeveless.
Suit with woolen pullover - Victoria & Albert Museum
Suit with woolen pullover - Victoria & Albert Museum

Something along these lines...
1940s woolen pullover
1940s woolen pullover

Given that Josef was wearing a grey suit with a blue hat, blue tie and blue handkerchief in his breast pocket, it would seem likely that his pullover was grey or blue-toned. Josef was apparently wearing 3 pullovers and 2 vests when he was found, which would have been quite bulky.

Shirt, Collar and Tie
Some lists indicate Josef had one shirt with collar and tie, while other indicate he had three shirts with a separate collar and tie. A separate collar is a bit mysterious but was apparently quite common back then.

The shirt would have looked something like this:
Collar-less shirt
Collar-less shirt

The separate collars might have looked something like this...
Detachable collars
Detachable collars

The full ensemble, with tie, might look like this. Albeit, this gentleman is wearing a different cut of suit with a vest and not a pullover. But, you get the idea.
Detachable collar with tie and shirt
Detachable collar with tie and shirt
Black Shoes with Grey Spats
To close off the sharp look that Josef was sporting, he was also wearing a pair of black shoes that were covered with grey spats with zip fasteners. Spats served two purposes, they protected shoes from mud and rain, and dressed up the entire outfit. They were usually made out of canvas or felt.

Spats with zip-fasteners
Spats with zip-fasteners

One MI5 report noted that Josef's shoes had brown laces but, clearly, if he was wearing spats, it didn't matter if his shoe laces were bright pink, no one would have noticed.
Spats and shoes
Spats and shoes

Blue Trilby Hat
Finally, topping off his outfit was a blue trilby hat.
Blue Trilby Hat
Blue Trilby Hat


    References

    Gentleman's Gazette - post on German fashion
    Ask Andy about Clothes - post on 1940s fashion

    08 January 2016

    Two Histories of Camp 020

    Lt. Col. R.W.G. Stephens
    Lt. Col. R.W.G. Stephens
    At the end of World War II, Brigadier Oswald Allen Harker, Deputy Director General of MI5 asked Lt. Col. George Frederick Sampson to write a brief history of Camp 020. In late September 1945, Sampson submitted his report to Harker and then retired from the Security Service, taking a job with the United Nations.

    At Sampson's request, the history was sent to Lt. Col. Robin William George Stephens, former commandant of Camp 020. Stephens read the history and offered his view.

    It was too brief. It needed to be rewritten. He would be happy to do the job.

    Stephens set about rewriting the history of Camp 020 with vigour despite the fact that he was serving as commandant of a British interrogation centre in Germany, Bad Nenndorf. While Stephens scribbled away in his unique style, avowing that "violence was taboo", prisoners at Bad Nenndorf were being physically abused by the guards.

    Camp 020 - MI5 and the Nazi Spies
    Camp 020 - MI5 and the Nazi Spies
    Stephens' history was published in 2000 by the National Archives, edited and prefaced by archivist Oliver Hoare. It makes for fascinating reading, but it is only one point of view.

    When I visited the National Archives in 2014, I wanted to have a look at the original files written by Stephens on Camp 020. these files were the ones edited and abridged by Oliver Hoare. Alas, the files were "unavailable".

    I browsed through the titles of other KV files (Security Service) and came across KV 4/8 - Sampson's original History of Camp 020. I ordered the file and it too makes for very interesting reading, in part because of the comparisons that can be drawn between the two histories.

    Both histories are written in the third person and generally do not mention the names of Camp 020 officers. When Stephens writes of the "Commandant" he is referring to himself. The Assistant Commandant was Sampson at one point, and later Douglas Bernard Stimson. The Resident Medical Officer who was present in the early days of Camp 020 was Henry Dearden.

    Lt. Col. George Frederick Sampson (from Imperial War Museum)
    Lt. Col. George Frederick Sampson
    (from Imperial War Museum)
    Sampson's history appears to be written very calmly and objectively. Stephen's history on the other hand verges on the flamboyant and provocative. Stephens happily applies nasty labels to prisoners or ethnic groups. One is left with the impression that Stephens was a bit of dictator with a hint of megalomania and a dash of bully. It takes a bit of effort to read beyond the name-calling and one is left wondering, how accurate are the portrayals of the spies? It becomes virtually impossible to peel off Stephen's subjective opinion of the hapless agents and approach anything like an objective assessment. Sampson's history, in that regard, is more helpful. His writing is coolly logical, descriptive and helpful.

    Both histories touch on the case histories of many of the spies who passed through Camp 020. Given that the original Stephen's file is "unavailable" at the National Archives, we must be content to use the Olive Hoare version. Given that I have a specific interest in Josef Jakobs I'll compare how Stephens and Sampson viewed him.

    KV 4/8 - Sampson on Josef Jakobs - page 9-10
    Though this case is not strictly speaking "pre-invasion", since this agent did not arrive till January 31st, 1941, it will be convenient to deal with it at this stage, together with the linked case of Karel Richter (see below) as they represent the lasts parachutists to be dispatched to this country by the Hamburg Abwehrstelle.

    Jakobs, a German national, when being dropped by parachute in the evening of January 31st, broke his ankle, so that on landing in a field at Ramsey, Huntingdonshire, he was unable to move. The next morning he attracted attention by firing shots with a revolver and was thereupon arrested. He had in his possession an identity-card in blank, a ration-book in blank, a W/T set, a partially destroyed German circular code, a touring map of England and 497.

    In view of his physical condition he could not be exhaustively interrogated before being transferred to hospital. He was naturally unable to deny that he was a German agent and his defence was that he had accepted his mission in order to escape from Germany. The investigation could not be continued until April 15th, when he returned from hospital. It revealed a criminal record and a maze of intrigue and double-dealing. His mission was weather reporting. He supplied some information about the organizations in Hamburg, where he had been trained in W/T, and The Hague, where he received meteorological instruction. The only valuable information which he gave related to the spy Richter, whom he had met at Hamburg and The Hague. Jakobs was shot as a spy in the Tower of London on August 15th, 1941.

    KV 4/8 - Sampson on Josef Jakobs - page 40
    The first of the clandestine agents [of 1941] was a German, Josef Jakobs, who was dropped by parachute in the evening of January 31st 1941 at Ramsay, Huntingdonshire. He broke his ankle when being dropped and was unable to move or to conceal his equipment which consisted of the usual W/T set, code, false identity papers, etc. He had in his possession £497, a much larger amount than that given to previous parachutists - an indication perhaps that the German invasion was no longer impending. In view of his physical condition he was interrogated very briefly at Camp 020 before being transferred to hospital. His defence was naturally that he had accepted his mission in order to escape from Germany.

    The investigation could not be continued until April 15th when Jakobs returned from hospital. It revealed a long criminal record and a maze of intrigue and double-dealing. His mission was weather-reporting. He supplied some information about the organization in Hamburg and The Hague, where he had been trained. The most valuable information which he gave related to the spy Richter, whom he had met at both places. Jakobs was shot as a spy in the Tower of London on August 15th 1941.

    Camp 020 - Stephens on Josef Jakobs - page 155
    The lull in airborne espionage traffic ended at 2100 hours on the night of 31 January 1941 with the arrival near Romsey [sic], Huntingdonshire, of a 43-year old German, Josef JAKOBS. He lay in a field with a broken ankle, draped by his parachute and surrounded by his equipment, until 0930 hours on the following morning, unable to move. He had been boldly shy hitherto of betraying his presence, but by this time the physical hurt had become unendurable. He drew a revolver and fire it into the air to attract attention and succour.

    He was quite unsympathetically taken into custody, for the police are zealous and such visitors are rare in Huntingdonshire. An inventory was taken of his property. It made interesting reading: two identity cards, one in blank, the other in the name of "James RYMER"; a ration book in blank; a portable radio transmitter; a partially destroyed circular code (No. 9); a Shell touring map of England; £497 in notes, and a Mauser revolver.

    A routine statement was taken from JAKOBS. He admitted that he had been despatched to England to send back weather reports to Germany. Of course he had never, never intended to carry out his mission; he had accepted it in order to escape from Germany. He would really like to make his way to America, where he had an aunt living in Illinois...

    He ofund himself at Camp 020 on the following day. The first interrogation, to which he was brought on a wheeled stretcher, was a painful affair. But it would have been improper, in view of the man's distraught condition, to go into the full details of his case at this stage. Instead, admissions were obtained from him on the salient features of his contacts, training and mission for immediate transmission to MI5.

    Josef Jakobs - February 2, 1941
    (From National Archives - KV 2/27)
    The man's agony could not be prolonged, if only in the interests of coherence and concentration; he was despatched to hospital after that preliminary step. He did not return until 15 April. The respite had obviously fortified his spirit. It soon became apparent that he was now determined to fight back. He was a doughty opponent across the interrogation table, shrewd and courageous. He sought to retract some of his earlier admissions; he volunteered no information of great value; he agreed to work under control only with manifest reluctance. Such facts as were dragged out of him were the fruits of perseverance and perspicacity.

    JAKOBS'  moral strength probably stemmed from his patriotism. He had few other moral qualities . He had started life as a respectable dentist, but he had gone into decay; he had served a sentence of imprisonment in Switzerland following deals in counterfeit gold; he had drawn handsome if unsavoury payment out of Jewish migrations, thought himself an Aryan; he had disgusted even the Gestapo by such activities and had been briefly confined by them. He would still have his interrogators believe that he had accepted his espionage mission only after consultation with his Jewish friends and in order to canvass funds for their organization.

    The actual circumstances of his recruitment were never made clear. He spoke vaguely of "Nachrichtendienst" officers in Berlin, Hamburg, The Hague. He gave few details of his training in weather reporting and radio transmission and little information about his contacts; he professed to know nothing about Abwehrstellen as such. When he named "BRUHNS" at Hamburg and "ZEBRA", the radio instructor at The Hague, ti was clear that he knew of and was known to at least two Asten; but the identity and station of his controlling officer and Stelle could not be established with any certainty.

    For JAKOBS remained stolidly true to his masters and fellows. He acknowledged acquaintance with another agent, Karel RICHTER, a later arrival by parachute, only when it was evident that his colleague was already known to us. At a subsequent confrontation with RICHTER he bore himself with apologetic resignation.

    JAKOBS was manifestly unemployable as a double agent; as a tome of reference in the living counter-espionage library that was being created at Camp 020 he would have drawn blank. There was no good reason why he should continue to live. He was prosecuted under the Treachery Act and sentenced to death. He died at the Tower of London on 15 Aug 1941, a brave man. His last words directed the "Tommies" of the firing squad to shoot straight.

    Camp 020 - Stephens on Josef Jakobs - page 51 and 105

    A few men, very few, were brave, Joachim JAKOBS, the German was one. He told the squad at the Tower of London to shoot straight. (page 51)

    The patriots are few, and these brave fewer still. They can be counted on the left hand. One, JAKOBS, a German, told the firing squad at the Tower of London to shoot straight. (page 105)

    Closing Thoughts
    Stephens was clearly a Character, one who infused a lot of himself into his written reports. In many ways, having his personal opinions expressed gives one an added lens through which to view the spies who came into his field of vision. He saw Josef as a "doughty opponent" and a "brave man". These were qualities that Stephens valued. He sneered at men who sniveled and whined and caved in before him. Perhaps he was influenced by his time with the Gurkhas in India, a regiment whose nickname - "Bravest of the Brave" - and motto likely stuck with him - "Better to die than to be a coward".

    Sampson's history is valuable for its concise factual nature. Stephens' history is valuable in providing a narrow lens through which one can view the spies from a personal perspective. Knowing the background of the lens (Stephens) is, of course, important. One can recognize the tint of the lens and how it has coloured his perspective.

    04 January 2016

    Breakthrough on Lt. Col. William Edward Hinchley Cooke

    Lt. Col. William Edward Hinchley Cooke (from After the Battle magazine)
    Lt. Col. William Edward Hinchley Cooke
    (from After the Battle magazine)
    For the past several months, I've been digging underneath the brick wall that surrounded the birth and parentage of Lt. Col. William Edward Hinchley Cooke.

    My two previous blogs can be found below:

    Britain's most famous World War II spy catcher had enigmatic beginnings but the curtain has now been pulled back from them.

    With the help of the British Army Personnel Records, Hinchley Cooke's great grand niece and the Dresden Landesarchiv , we have a birth date and now a birth record for the famous spy catcher.

    At the same time that I wrote to the Dresden archives, the birth, marriage and death records for Dresden, from the late 1800s and early 1900s, were released on the genealogy website Ancestry, resulting in a treasure trove of information.

    I am still working on deciphering the German handwriting but here's what we've got so far.

    Introducing the Family
    Hinchley Cooke's father was William Thomas Cooke, born 22 February, 1856, in Coseley, Staffordshire. William's parents were Henry Cooke and Jane Gough, both from Staffordshire. William apparently worked as a language teacher in Dresden and was a certified translator at the local and district court (amts- und landgericht).

    Entry in 1909 Dresden telephone book for William Thomas Cooke (from Ancestry.co.uk)
    Entry in 1909 Dresden telephone book for William Thomas Cooke
    (from Ancestry.co.uk)
    Hinchley Cooke's mother was Angeline Elizabeth Jordan born 30 October, 1860, in Dresden, Germany. Angelina's parents were Dr. Ernst Wilhelm Jordan PhD and Pauline Emilie Mathilda Alt.

    William Thomas Cooke and Angeline Elizabeth Jordan were married on 4 July, 1891 in Dresden.

    Their first child was born 13 September, 1892, in Dresden. Unfortunately the young Harry Ernest Bernard Cecil Cooke didn't live long, passing away on 26 January, 1893 in Dresden at the age of four months.

    A year later, on 31 January, 1894, William and Angeline welcomed a second son into their life, William Edward Hinchley Cooke.

    Synopsis of information from William Edward Hinchley Cooke's birth registration. (From Ancestry.co.uk)
    Synopsis of information from William Edward Hinchley Cooke's birth registration.
    (apparently the Ancestry transcribers also struggled with the German handwriting)
    (From Ancestry.co.uk)
    On 14 December, 1897, Hinchley Cooke received the gift of a younger sister when Harriett Margaret Elizabeth was born. Unfortunately, tragedy would strike the family less than two months later. On 31 January, 1898, on Hinchley Cooke's fourth birthday, his mother passed away.


    William Thomas Cooke mourned the passing of his first wife and then married Emma Sophia Margaretha Werther on 16 November, 1899, in Dresden. This marriage, however, would also end in tragedy, and apparently childless. On 11 April, 1901, Emma passed away in Dresden. Hinchley Cooke would have been 7 years old when his step mother died. He still had his father and sister; for a few years at least. On 9 August, 1911, Hinchley Cooke's sister, Harriet passed away at the age of 13.

    In 1914, Hinchley Cooke, who was working for the British Legation in Dresden, was deported to Britain, along with the other diplomatic staff. There is no information on the fate of his father.

    A few mysteries still remain in the story of William Edward Hinchley Cooke. What happened to his father? How did Hinchley Cooke receive British citizenship, given that he was apparently not registered as a British citizen at birth? But for now... a bit of the veil has been pulled away. 

    References
    Ancestry.co.uk - birth, marriage, death records
    British Army Personnel record for William Edward Hinchley Cooke